Columbia University Medical Center

CUMC Celebrates 2015-2016, Issue 2

cumccelebrates
CUMC Celebrates 2015/2016 Issue 1CUMC CELEBRATES acknowledges faculty, staff, and students at Columbia University Medical Center who receive major research grants, who earn prestigious honors, who are elected to honorary societies, or who take leadership positions in professional organizations. Celebrates also gratefully acknowledges the gifts made by donors and friends of the Medical Center and highlights faculty who have appeared in the news recently. If you have an award or honor that you would like to have listed in Celebrates, please fill out this online form. Please note: all federal grants are automatically included based on institutional data provided by Sponsored Projects Administration. For more information, send an email to the Celebrates editor. Click on the image at right to print this issue.

Research Grants / Awards & Honors / Philanthropic Gifts / CUMC in the News

 

RESEARCH GRANTS

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS

Cory Abate-Shen, PhD, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, received $300,000 over two years from the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network for “Epigenetic Regulation of Bladder Cancer Progression.”

Domenico Accili, MD, Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, received $2,125,000 over three years from the JPB Foundation for “Causes and Treatment of B Cell Dedifferentiation in Diabetes.”

Cande Ananth, PhD, Obstetrics & Gynecology, received $440,000 over two years from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for “Air Pollution and Risk of Placental Abruption in New York City.”

Ottavio Arancio, MD, PhD, Taub Institute, received $1,640,000 over five years from the National Institute on Aging for “Extracellular Tau Oligomers and Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Graham Barr, MD, DrPH, Medicine, received $3,504,839 over four years from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for “Pulmonary Microvascular Perfusion in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.”

Francesca Bartolini, PhD, Pathology & Cell Biology, received $250,000 over three years from the BrightFocus Foundation for “Formin-Induced Stable Microtubules in Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Uttiya Basu, PhD, Microbiology & Immunology, received $550,000 over five years from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society for “Transcriptional Regulation of Non-Coding RNA Promotes AID Targeting and Chromosomal Alterations in the B-Cell Genome.” 

John Bilezikian, MD, Medicine, received $1,363,492 over five years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Training Program in Endocrinology and Metabolism” in a competitive renewal.

David J. Brenner, PhD, Center for Radiological Research, received $300,000 over two years from USHIO for “Apparatus, Method, and System for Selectively Effecting and/or Killing Bacteria.”

Andrea Califano, PhD, Systems Biology, received an Outstanding Investigator Award of $6,666,352 over seven years from the National Cancer Institute for “Elucidating the Dependencies of Tumor Initiating and Drug-Resistant Niches in Human Malignancies by Genome-Wide Molecular Profiling of Single Cells.” 

Frederick Chang, MD, PhD, Microbiology & Immunology, received $1,919,457 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Assembly and Placement of the Cell Division Ring” in a competitive renewal. Dr. Chang also received $700,239 from the National Science Foundation over three years for “Bilateral BBSRC-NSF/BIO Regulation of Cell Size in Fission Yeast.”

Angela Christiano, PhD, Dermatology, received $1,939,571 over four years from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases for “Functional Genomics of Alopecia Areata.”

Lorraine Clark, PhD, Pathology & Cell Biology, received $5,669,394 over five years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “Identification of Susceptibility Genes for Essential Tremor.”

Kirsten Lawrence Cleary, MD, Obstetrics & Gynecology, received $353,484 over five years from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for “Chronic Hypertension and Pregnancy (CHAP).”

Sandra Comer, PhD, Psychiatry, received $420,030 over two years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Measure Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Substance Abusers.”

Ziva Cooper, PhD, Psychiatry, received $1,433,594 over two years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Preclinical Synthetic Cannabinoid Vapor Inhalation: Acute and Chronic Effects.”

Remi Creusot, PhD, Medicine, received $440,000 over two years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Engineering and Targeting Novel Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Interfaces.”

Peter Dayan, MD, Pediatrics, received $2,399,996 over four years from the Health Resources and Services Administration for “EMSC Network Development Demonstration Project (NDDP)” in a competitive renewal.

Thomas Diacovo, MD, Pediatrics, received $2,609,514 over five years from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for “Neonatal and Pediatric Platelet Function and Pharmacology.”

Jane Dodd, PhD, Physiology & Cellular Biophysics, received $440,000 over two years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “Trans-Synaptic Tracing of Developing Somatosensory Circuits.”

Karen Duff, PhD, Pathology & Cell Biology, and Syed Abid Hussaini, PhD, Taub Institute, received $2,365,320 over five years from the National Institute on Aging for “Entorhinal-Hippocampal Circuit Dysfunction in AD Mice.”

Mitchell Elkind, MD, Neurology, received $264,200 over five years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “Neurology Research Education and Mentorship Program” in a competitive renewal.

Katherine Elkington, PhD, Psychiatry, received $743,985 over three years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Family Engagement, Cross-System Linkage to SU Treatment for Juvenile Probationers.”

Qing Fan, PhD, Pharmacology, received $1,264,000 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Structural Studies of Human Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor.” 

Adolfo Ferrando, MD, PhD, and Daniel Herranz, PhD, both of the Institute for Cancer Genetics, received $341,712 over two years from the National Cancer Institute for “Functional Dissection of Oncogenic Enhancers.”

Zachary Freyberg, MD, PhD, Psychiatry, received $372,384 over two years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Revealing Novel Mechanisms of Amphetamine Action in Drosophila Model.”

Alexander Friedman, MD, Obstetrics & Gynecology, received $522,728 over four years from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for “Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award.”

Eduardo Francisco Gallo, PhD, Psychiatry, received $737,156 over four years from the National Institute of Mental Health for “D2 Receptors in Cholinergic Interneurons: Role in Striatal Circuitry & Motivation.”

Jean Gautier, PhD, DrSc, Institute for Cancer Genetics, received an Outstanding Investigator Award of $5,926,353 over seven years from the National Cancer Institute for “DNA Repair and Genomic Instability in Cancer Development and Therapy.” 

Monica Goldklang, MD, Anesthesiology, received $654,210 over five years from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for “Smoke Induced Alterations in Ion Channel Function.”

David Goldstein, PhD, Institute for Genomic Medicine, received $3,695,000 over one year from Biogen Idec for “Biogen Idec.”

Maxwell Gottesman, MD, PhD, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, received $1,063,731 over three years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Hormones: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.”

Jacqueline Gottlieb, PhD, Neuroscience, received $1,950,898 over five years from the National Eye Institute for “Top-Down Selection of Task-Relevant Cues: Neural Mechanisms in the Frontal and Parietal Lobes.”

Iva Greenwald, PhD, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, received $1,317,048 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Spatial, Temporal, and Environmental Regulation of Early Gonadogenesis in C. Elegans.”

Ulrich Hengst, PhD, Taub Institute, received $250,000 over three years from the BrightFocus Foundation for “Long-Range Retrograde Stress Signaling in AD.”

Oliver Hobert, PhD, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, received $1,363,300 over four years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “Sexually Dimorphic Regulation of Neuronal Identity in C. Elegans.”

Christina W. Hoven, DrPH, Psychiatry, received $3,434,857 over five years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Cognitive Control in Children of SUD Parents: A Longitudinal Multimodal MRI.” Dr. Hoven also received $490,640 over one year from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health for “Context and Ethnic Diversity: Children’s Responses to 9/11.” 

May Hua, MD, Anesthesiology, received $862,510 over five years from the National Institute on Aging for “Determinants of Critical Care Intensity for Hospitalized Older Adults: The Effect of Hospital-Based Palliative Care Services.”

Jonathan Javitch, MD, PhD, Psychiatry, received $1,922,311 over five years from the National Institute of Mental Health for “Training in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders: From Animal Models to Patients.”

Laura Johnston, PhD, Genetics & Development, received $1,332,256 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Mechanisms of Cell Competition that Regulate Growth During Development” in a competitive renewal. 

Annemieke de Jong, PhD, Dermatology, received $575,290 over five years from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases for “K01 – Activation of Human Skin T Cells by Mammalian and Microbial Lipids Presented by CD1a.”

Eric Kandel, MD, Neuroscience, received $1,875,000 over three years from the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation for “The Cohen Research Program at Columbia University to Study a Genetic, Structural, and Therapeutic Approach to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Related Drug Abuse.”

Gerard Karsenty, MD, PhD, Genetics & Development, received $9,460,729 over five years from the National Institute on Aging for “The Dialogue Between Bone and the Brain: Endocrine and Molecular Bases.”

Steven Kernie, MD, Pediatrics, received $451,382 over one year from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “The Role of ApoE Injury-Induced Neurogenesis.”

Krzysztof Kiryluk, MD, Medicine, received $2,128,340 over five years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Genetics of LgA Nephropathy by Integrative Network-Based Association Studies.”

Minoree Kohwi, PhD, Neuroscience, received $500,000 over five years from the Rita Allen Foundation for “Mechanisms of Neural Stem Cell Competence Regulation during Brain Development.”

Rita Kukafka, DrPH, Biomedical Informatics, received $966,436 from the Office of Health Information Technology for “Columbia University Workforce Training to Educate Healthcare Professionals.”

Anil Lalwani, MD, Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, received $2,692,616 over five years from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders for “Intracochlear Delivery of Therapeutics Across RWM via Microneedle Array.”

Frances R. Levin, MD, Psychiatry, received $736,440 over three years from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for “Training Medical and Dental Students in SBIRT.” She also received $868,430 over five years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Substance Abuse Treatment Development and Clinical Research Mentoring.”

Richard Levy, MD, Anesthesiology, received $1,091,461 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Carbon Monoxide Exposure and Anesthesia-Induced Neurotoxicity.”

Filippo Mancia, PhD, Physiology & Cellular Biophysics, received $1,643,929 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Lipid Biosynthesis and Modification by Integral-Membrane Enzymes.” He also received $440,000 over two years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Structural Basis of Phosphoinositide Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium.”

Tom Maniatis, PhD, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, received $1,533,056 over four years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “The Role of Clustered Protocadherins in Neurite Self-Avoidance.” He also received $1,127,000 over two years from the Takeda Pharmaceutical Company for “The Role of Autophagy and Innate Immunity in ALS Disease Progression.”

Richard Mann, PhD, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, received $1,969,951 over five years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “Development and Function of an Adult Locomotion Circuit in Drosophila” in a competitive renewal.

Guy McKhann, MD, Neurosurgery, received $250,000 over two years from Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy for “Targeting the mTOR pathway in Glioma-Associated Epilepsy in Mice and Humans.”

Jacquelyn Leigh Meyers, PhD, Psychiatry, received $572,521 over five years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Gene-Environment Interaction for Cannabis Use Disorders in Blacks and Whites in the U.S.”

Yuval Neria, PhD, Psychiatry, received $1,696,334 over fours years from the National Institute of Mental Health for “Neural Signature of Fear Overgeneralization in Trauma Exposed Adults.”

Russell Nicholls, PhD, Taub Institute, received $275,600 over two years from the Department of the Army for “Retinoid X Receptor Gamma S: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Fragile X Syndrome.”

Sharon Oberfield, MD, Pediatrics, received $1,023,399 over five years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Training Grant in Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism.”

Max O’Donnell, MD, Medicine, received $402,489 over three years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Biomarker for XDR-TB Treatment Response and Drug Resistance in HIV Endemic Area.”

Utpal Pajvani, MD, PhD, Medicine, received $1,783,658 over five years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Notch, Type 2 Diabetes, and NAFLD.”

Arthur Palmer III, PhD, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, received $1,417,238 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Protein Motions in Recognition, Regulation, and Catalysis.”

Dane Parker, PhD, Pediatrics, received $383,800 over one year from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for “Role of Interferons in Staphylococcus Aureus Upper Respiratory Tract Infection.”

Liza Pon, PhD, Pathology & Cell Biology, received $300,000 over three years from the Muscular Dystrophy Association for “A Newly Identified Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: Mechanisms and Interventions.”

Jianwen Que, PhD, Medicine, received $297,865 over four years from the National Institute on Aging for “Nutrient Signaling and Stem Cell Maintenance in Aging Epithelia.”

Raul Rabadan, PhD, Biomedical Informatics, received $1,349,618 over four years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Uncovering the Structure of Evolution Using the Topology of Genomic Data.”

Stephen Rayport, MD, PhD, Psychiatry, received $2,943,871 over five years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Functional Connectome Analysis of Amphetamine Action at Dopamine Neuron Synapses.” He also received $458,870 over two years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Mapping Dopamine Neuron Co-Transmission by Proximity Detection.”

Reuben Robbins, PhD, Psychiatry, received $471,056 over two years from the National Institute of Nursing Research for “Improving HIV Care with mHealth Tools:  An App to Detect Neurocognitive Impairment.”

Steven Reiner, MD, Microbiology & Immunology, received $1,766,667 over four years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Asymmetric Lymphocyte Division in the Immune Response” in a competitive renewal.

Moira Rynn, MD, and Rachel Marsh, PhD, Psychiatry, received $1,981,776 over five years from the National Institute of Mental Health for “Translational Research Training in Child Psychiatry” in a competitive renewal. They also received $352,844 over one year from the National Institute of Mental Health for “Translational Research Training in Child Psychiatry.”

Maya Sabatello, PhD, Psychiatry, received $871,032 over five years from the National Human Genome Research Institute for “Impact of Psychiatric Genetic Data Litigation and its Relationship with Stigma.”

Lisa Saiman, MD, Pediatrics, received $677,431 over three years from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics for “Improving Implementation of Infection Prevention/Control in CF Communities.”

Michael Shen, PhD, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, received $382,800 from the National Cancer Institute for “Modeling Human Prostate Cancer by Cellular Reprogramming.”

Steven Siegelbaum, PhD, Neuroscience, received $457,091 over two years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “Evaluating CA2 Neurons as Novel Targets in Epilepsy.”

Scott A. Small, MD, Taub Institute, received $12,080,545 over five years from the National Institute on Aging for “Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center – Overall” in a competitive renewal.

Jared Van Snellenberg, PhD, Psychiatry, received $919,152 over five years for “Translational Neuroscience of Functional Connectivity in Schizophrenia.”

Julie Spicer, PhD, Psychiatry, received $264,064 over two years from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development for “SES and Allostatic Load: Pregnancy Outcomes and Maternal Neurobehavior.”

Joanna E. Steinglass, MD, Psychiatry, received $2,163,850 from the National Institute of Mental Health over four years for “Neural Mechanisms of Food Choice in Anorexia Nervosa.”

Melissa Stockwell, MD, Pediatrics, received $749,929 over three years from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for “SINC: Synchronized Immunization Notifications.”

Milan Stojanovic, PhD, Medicine, received $320,000 over five years from the National Science Foundation for “Molecular Computing for the Real World” and $612,412 from the National Cancer Institute for “Automated Microfluidic Selection of Aptamers Against Carbohydrates.”

Thomas Scott Stroup, MD, Psychiatry, received $1,409,937 over three years from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute for “Comparative Effectiveness of Adaptive Pharmacotherapy Strategies for Schizophrenia.”

Megan Sykes, MD, Center for Translational Immunology, received $3,919,975 over five years from the Office of the NIH Director for “Robust Allograft Tolerance in Non-Human Primates.”

Saeed Tavazoie, PhD, Systems Biology, received $2,183,846 over five years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Comprehensive Genetic Analysis of Antibiotic Persistence.”

Stephen Tsang, MD, PhD, Ophthalmology, received $1,593,000 over four years from the National Eye Institute for “Gene Silencing and Gene Editing in Phototransduction.”

Teresa Palomero Vazquez, PhD, Institute for Cancer Genetics, received $1,830,000 over five years from the National Cancer Institute for “The Role of RHOA G17V Mutation on Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas.”

Subramanyam Venkata, PhD, Physiology & Cellular Biophysics, received $308,000 over four years from the American Heart Association for “Mechanisms Underlying Dysfunctional CAV1.2 and NAV1.5 Function During Brugada Syndrome in the Heart.”

Marcella Walker, MD, Medicine, received $440,000 over two years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Neurocognitive Features.”

Elaine Wan, MD, Medicine, received $308,000 over four years from the American Heart Association for “Role of Vascular Ion Channels in Heart Failure and Cardiovascular Diseases.”

Harris Wang, PhD, Systems Biology, received $1,981,810 over one year from Rockefeller University for “A Minimally Invasive Synthetic Biology-Driven Approach for Natural Products Discovery.” He also received $823,905 over one year from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for “In Situ Genome Engineering of Unculturable Microbes and Genomic Recording to Limit the Robustness of the Genetic Code.”

Timothy C. Wang, MD, Medicine, received $1,796,385 over five years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Function and Regulation of Progastrin Receptors on Intestinal Progenitors.”

Myrna M. Weissman, PhD, Psychiatry, received $1,703,348 over two years from the John Templeton Foundation for “Understanding the Role of Belief in the Resilience of Families at Risk for Depression: Religion, Brain Structure, and Function.”

William Whang, MD, Medicine, received $2,604,529 over four years from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for “Test of a New Theory to Explain Excess Risk in Cardiac PTSD.”

Debra Wolgemuth, PhD, Institute of Human Nutrition, received $1,203,942 over five years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Graduate Training in Nutrition.”

Masayuki Yazawa, PhD, Rehabilitation & Regenerative Medicine, received $550,000 over one year from the Japan Science and Technology Agency for “Developing Novel Optical Probes to Understanding Biological Activities.”

Chaolin Zhang, PhD, Systems Biology, received $1,719,121 over five years from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for “RNA Regulatory Networks in Motor Neuron Development and Function.”

Xin Zhang, PhD, Ophthalmology, received $1,849,682 over five years from the National Eye Institute for “PDGF Signaling in Lens Development.”

Emmanuel Zorn, PhD, Center for Translational Immunology, received $1,825,862 over five years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Contribution of B Cells to Human Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy.”

 

MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Elaine Abrams, MD, ICAP, received $2,992,374 over 15 months from the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation for “CIFF Kenya for ACT-Accelerating Children’s HIV/AIDS Treatment Initiative.” She also received $475,000 over eight months from the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation for “Accelerating Children’s HIV/AIDS Treatment (ACT) Initiative.”

Howard F. Andrews, PhD, Biostatistics, received $995,205 over five years from the National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities for “Using Longitudinal Data to Characterize the Natural History of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) to Improve Services and Outcomes-Data Coordinating Center (Component B).”

Ryan Demmer, PhD, Epidemiology, received $3,154,656 over five years from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “The Subgingival Microbiome and Impaired Glucose Regulation.”

Wafaa El-Sadr, MD, MPH, ICAP, received $856,223 over two years from Family Health International for “HPTN076 Protocol.”

Jemima Frimpong, PhD, Health Policy and Management, received $701,668 over two years from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “A Bundled Rapid HIV/HCV Testing Intervention to Increase Receipt of Test Results.” 

Jeff Goldsmith, PhD, Biostatistics, received $395,200 over two years from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering for “Generalized, Multilevel Functional Response Models Applied to Accelerometer Data.”

Heather Greenlee, PhD, Epidemiology, received $2,776,192 over five years from the National Cancer Institute for “Cook for Your Life: Maintaining Dietary Change Among Breast Cancer Survivors.”

Tomas Guilarte, PhD, Environmental Health Sciences, received $2,978,963 over five years from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for “NMDA Receptor Function in Lead Neurotoxicity” in a competitive renewal.

Muhammad Parvez, PhD, Environmental Health Sciences, Joseph Graziano, PhD, Environmental Health Sciences, and Xinhua Liu, PhD, Biostatistics, received $1,844,057 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for “Arsenic Exposure, Impaired Respiratory Function, and Immunosuppression.”

Frederica Perera, PhD, DrPH, Environmental Health Sciences, received $300,000 over two years from the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund for “Children’s Environmental Health Research and Translating Science to Prevention” in a competitive renewal.

Miriam Rabkin, MD, ICAP, received $7,500,000 over five years from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for “Global Health Security Partnership Engagement: Expanding Efforts and Strategies to Protect and Improve Public Health Globally – USNY.” She also received $800,000 over five years from the Health Resources and Services Administration for “Quality Improvement Center.”

William Reidy, PhD, MPH, ICAP, received $345,228 over two years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Mother Infant Retention Across the Option B Plus Cascade.” 

Regina Santella, PhD, Environmental Health Sciences, and Mary Beth Terry, PhD, Epidemiology, received $250,000 over one year from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation for “Environmental Exposures Epigenetics and Breast Cancer Risk.”

John Santelli, MD, MPH, Population and Family Health, received $509,867 over three years from the Merck Company Foundation for “Connecting Adolescents and Young Adults to Preventive Health Care Services.”

Marni Sommer, DrPH, Sociomedical Sciences, and Richard Parker, PhD, Sociomedical Sciences, received $387,028 over two years from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism for “Structural Intervention for Adolescent Alcohol Use and HIV Risk in Tanzania.”

 

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Rebecca Schnall, PhD, Nursing, received $2,331,859 over five years from the National Institute of Nursing Research for “Video Information Provider for HIV-Associated Non-Aids (VIP-HANA) Symptoms.”

 

COLLEGE OF DENTAL MEDICINE

Burton Edelstein, DDS, Community Health, received $1,695,472 over 10 years from the Health Resources and Services Administration for “Postdoctoral Training in General, Pediatric & Public Health Dentistry & Dental Hygiene” in a competitive renewal and $3,742,997 over 10 years from the Health Resources and Services Administration for “Advanced Clinical Training in Oral Health Networking (ACTION).”

 

AWARDS & HONORS

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS

Ferdinand C. Valentine Medical Student Research Grants

The New York Academy of Medicine awarded two College of Physicians & Surgeons students with the Ferdinand C. Valentine Medical Student Research Grant in Urology.

  • Danny Lascano, P&S student, “Is Fibroblast Growth Factor-23, A Marker of Chronic Kidney Disease, Elevated in Cases of De-Novo Surgical Chronic Kidney Disease?”
  • Ifeanyi Onyeji, P&S student, “Investigation of Nab-Rapamycin for Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Refractory Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.”

Glorney-Riasbeck Fellowships in Cardiovascular Disease

 The New York Academy of Medicine awarded two College of Physicians & Surgeons researchers with the prestigious Glorney-Riasbeck Fellowships in Cardiovascular Diseases.

  • Adam Castano, MD, Medicine, “Technetium Pyrophosphate Cardiac Imaging to Determine if Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis Explains Paradoxical Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis.”
  • Nathaniel Langer, MD, Surgery, “The Role of Myostatin in Right Ventricular Dysfunction during Pressure Overload.”

 Anne Marie Albano, PhD, Psychiatry, received the 2015 Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies award for outstanding contributions by an individual for clinical activities.

David Brenner, PhD, DsC, Center for Radiological Research, has been awarded the 2015 Weldon Memorial Prize by the University of Oxford. The prize is awarded to a scholar who has “published the most noteworthy contribution to the development of mathematical or statistical methods applied to problems in biology” in the past decade. 

The National Endowment for the Humanities identified its 2003 grant to Rita Charon, MD, PhD, Medicine, for “Narrative Medicine: Teaching Humanities to Health Professionals” as one that “changed the landscape of the humanities.” Other Columbia faculty on the project were Sayantani DasGupta, MD, Pediatrics, Craig Irvine, PhD, Medicine, Eric Marcus, MD, Psychiatry, and Maura Spiegel, PhD, English.

Edward J. Ciaccio, PhD, Medicine, was selected to give keynote speeches at Atrial Signals 2015 in Karlsruhe, Germany, and at the Fourth International Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology 2015 in Shanghai, China.

Daniel Duzdevich, doctoral candidate in Molecular Biology, received the Josephine de Karman Fellowship Trust Award for “Single Molecule Studies of Eukaryotic DNA Replication.”

Oliver Hobert, PhD, Systems Biology, has received a Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Eric Kandel, MD, Neuroscience, had a high school in Ahrensburg, Germany, named in his honor earlier this year. The school chose Dr. Kandel’s name in recognition of his scholarly achievements and social responsibility.

Roberto Lewis-Fernandez, MD, Psychiatry, became president of the Society for the Study of Psychiatry and Culture. He will serve for three years.

Kenneth P. Olive, PhD, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, received a Ruth Leff Siegel Award in recognition of his important findings on pancreatic stroma.

Oliver M. Stroeh, MD, Psychiatry, was named the John F. McDermott Assistant Editor-in-Residence from 2016-2017 for the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. He will also edit the journal’s online companion, JAACAP Connect.

Patricia Wasserman, MD, Pathology & Cell Biology, has received the President’s Award from the American Society of Cytopathology (ASC) in recognition of her contributions to the ASC.

Myrna M. Weissman, PhD, Psychiatry, was selected to receive the 2016 Yale Psychiatry Distinguished Alumni Award in May 2016.

 

MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Mark Hatzenbuehler, PhD, Sociomedical Sciences, was named recipient of the 2015 Louise Kidder Early Career Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, which recognizes early career contributions from social issues researchers.

Dawn L. Hershman, MD, Epidemiology, received the 2015 Comparative Effectiveness Research Professorship in Breast Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology/Conquer Cancer Foundation and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Kim Hopper, PhD, Sociomedical Sciences, is the 2015 recipient of the George Foster Practicing Medical Anthropology Award, granted by the American Anthropological Association.   

Guohua Li, MD, Epidemiology, will receive the American Public Health Association (APHA) Excellence in Science Award for his leadership in the science of injury/violence prevention and control. He will be presented with the award at the APHA national meeting in November.

Rachel Shelton, PhD, Sociomedical Sciences, was named associate editor of the journal Health Education & Behavior and was also invited to serve as ad hoc reviewer for the American Cancer Society’s peer review committee on psychosocial and behavioral research. 

Karolynn Siegel, PhD, Sociomedical Sciences, was named a member of the Steering Committee of the Center for Research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic, and Behavioral Genetics.

 

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Four faculty members were named Fellows of the New York Academy of Medicine:

  • Kenrick Cato, PhD, Clinical Informatics
  • Stephen Ferrara, DNP, Clinical Affairs
  • Kathleen Hickey, EdD, Nursing
  • Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, Nursing

Suzanne Bakken, RN, PhD, Biomedical Informatics, has been named the 2015-2016 Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence at the National Academy of Medicine.

Dawn Dowding, PhD, Nursing, was appointed a member of the Biomedical Computing and Health Informatics Study Section, Center for Scientific Review.

Amanda Hessels, PhD, Nursing, received the Heros Implementation Research Scholar Award from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control.

Kathleen Hickey, Nursing, EdD, was named a National Institute of Nursing Research ambassador.

Laura Zeidenstein, DNP, Nurse Midwifery, was inducted as a Fellow of the American College of Nurse Midwives.

 

COLLEGE OF DENTAL MEDICINE

The College of Dental Medicine will receive the prestigious 2015 INSIGHT into Diversity Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award for the second year in a row. This is the only national recognition honoring colleges and universities that exhibit outstanding efforts and success in the area of diversity and inclusion. Columbia University as a whole was also recognized.

 

PHILANTHROPIC GIFTS

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS

An anonymous donor made a pledge of $1,300,000 to advance research at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain.

A foundation made a contribution of $1,000,000 toward a $3,000,000 commitment to the Gerald D. Fischbach, MD, Professorship of Neuroscience.

A donor made a $1,000,000 commitment to support research and training in the Division of Cardiology.

A contribution of $875,000 was made toward a $10,500,000 commitment to advance research into the mechanisms of brain and gut function and the ways they are affected by nurture.

A foundation made a $700,000 contribution toward a $7,000,000 commitment to advance research at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain.

An anonymous donor made a $650,000 gift to advance research at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain.

A foundation made a contribution of $650,000 in support of pediatric oncology research at Columbia.

A donor made a contribution of $625,000 toward a $1,250,000 commitment to provide fellowship support to the Division of Cardiology.

A donor made a $600,000 commitment to enhance clinical care at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center and a $400,000 pledge to the Division of Cardiology to advance aortic valve disease research and care.

A $555,000 commitment was made to the Department of Neurology to enhance multidisciplinary care and supportive services for adult patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

A donor made a contribution of $500,000 toward a commitment of $2,500,000 to provide professorship support to the Division of Cardiology.

A donor made a $500,000 contribution toward a $2,500,000 commitment to support an endowed professorship in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

An anonymous donor made a $500,000 contribution toward a $2,000,000 commitment to the Integrative Therapies Program for Children with Cancer in the Department of Pediatrics’ Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation.

A private foundation made a contribution of $500,000 toward a $2,000,000 commitment to the Department of Psychiatry to support the Neuroscience Fellows Program.

A bequest of $500,000 was realized to support a Cardiology Patient Care Suite.

A contribution of $326,290 was made to advance research at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain.

A donor made a $300,000 contribution to the Department of Medicine to provide fellowship support to the Division of Cardiology.

A family foundation made a $275,000 gift to the Department of Pediatrics to support the IFAP Global Health Program.

A contribution of $250,000 was made toward a commitment of $1,500,000 to the Department of Psychiatry to advance research and clinical care in nonverbal learning disabilities in the Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

A family foundation made a contribution of $250,000 toward a $1,250,000 commitment to establish a professorship in the Department of Medicine.

A private foundation made a contribution of $250,000 toward a $1,000,000 commitment to provide fellowship support to the Division of Cardiology.

A foundation made a $250,000 commitment to support the new Medical and Graduate Education Building.

A gift of $780,625 from an anonymous donor was made to the Department of Neurological Surgery to support low-grade glioma research.

A private foundation made a $250,000 gift to the Department of Ophthalmology to advance research on age-related macular degeneration.

A foundation made a contribution of $240,000 to the Department of Ophthalmology to advance research on ophthalmologic diseases and disorders.

A private foundation made a $240,000 pledge to the Department of Pediatrics’ Division of Neonatology and Perinatology to support the Neonatal Comfort Care Program.

A foundation made a contribution of $232,000 to complete a $1,160,000 commitment to the Department of Psychiatry to advance efforts to prevent suicide among college students.

A Columbia University alumnus and faculty member made a gift of $225,000 to support the Chairman’s Frontier Fund in the Department of Psychiatry.

A private foundation made a contribution of $204,400 toward an $811,000 commitment to the Department of Psychiatry to support a fellowship and advance research in domestic violence.

A P&S alumnus made a contribution of $201,000 toward a 1,000,000 commitment to support the new Medical and Graduate Education Building.

A donor made a $200,000 contribution to complete a $1,000,000 commitment to the Division of Endocrinology to advance osteoporosis research.

A family made a contribution of $200,000 toward pledges totaling $1,000,000 to advance research and clinical initiatives in the Departments of Surgery and Medicine and an additional gift of $250,000 to advance cardiology research.

A donor made a $200,000 contribution toward the new Medical and Graduate Education Building.

A foundation made a contribution of $195,000 to support the work of the Center for Theoretical Neuroscience.

A foundation made a contribution of $191,684 to the Department of Orthopedic Surgery to advance clinical research and patient care at the Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center.

A corporation made a contribution of $175,000 to support research in omega-3 fatty acids and novel lipid emulsions at the Institute of Human Nutrition.

A donor made a contribution of $172,500 toward a $1,380,000 commitment to the Department of Ophthalmology to advance research on latent retina dystrophies.

An anonymous donor made a contribution of $150,000 toward a $1,000,000 commitment to provide scholarship support to the College of Physicians & Surgeons.

A corporation made a $150,000 contribution to the Department of Surgery to advance research in plastic, craniofacial, and reconstructive surgery.

A family foundation made a $150,000 gift to the Department of Psychiatry to advance care and rehabilitation services at the Lieber Recovery and Rehabilitation Clinic.

A donor made a contribution of $131,945 toward a $250,000 pledge to the Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center Endowment Fund.

A family foundation made a $128,100 commitment to the Department of Ophthalmology to advance genetic research on Usher IIIA, a rare retinal disorder.

A donor made a $128,100 commitment to the Department of Ophthalmology to advance genetic research on Usher IIIA.

A foundation made a contribution of $127,000 to the Department of Psychiatry to support a fellowship in women’s mental health.

A donor made a contribution of $113,600 to advance research on lymphoma and other hematological cancers at the Center for Lymphoid Malignancies.

A family made a $111,000 gift to provide fellowship support to the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at Columbia University Medical Center.

A family foundation made a contribution of $100,000 toward a $1,000,000 commitment to provide fellowship support to the Division of Cardiology.

A donor made a $100,000 contribution toward a $300,000 commitment to advance research at the Department of Urology.

A private foundation made a $100,000 contribution toward a $300,000 pledge to the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology to advance placenta and preeclampsia research.

A corporate foundation made a contribution of $100,000 to support scholarships at the College of Physicians & Surgeons.

A college made a contribution of $100,000 to provide unrestricted support to the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

A donor made a $100,000 gift to support the Global Mental Health Program at Columbia University Medical Center.

A P&S alumnus and faculty member made a gift of $100,000 to advance mitochondrial function research in the Department of Psychiatry’s Division of Behavioral Medicine.

 

MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

A foundation made a gift of $2,000,000 toward the establishment of a professorship in global health.

A donor made two gifts totaling $1,250,000 toward the ME/CFS Microbiome Study at the Center for Infection and Immunity.

A bequest of $421,862 will provide scholarship support at the Mailman School of Public Health.

A donor made a contribution of $100,000 toward the Mailman School of Public Health Benefit Dinner on Oct. 28, 2015.

 

COLLEGE OF DENTAL MEDICINE 

A company made a $300,000 contribution toward a $1,400,000 pledge to help educate predoctoral and postgraduate residents in the latest surgical and prosthetic implant techniques.

A bequest of $150,000 was realized to provide scholarship support to the College of Dental Medicine.

A company made a $100,000 gift to enhance the College of Dental Medicine’s dental implant program.


CUMC IN THE NEWS

See more in Weekly Media Reports available online.

USA TODAY
Some Health Experts Say the USA Hasn’t Learned Key Lessons from Ebola Experience – September 22, 2015

“No one has performed a careful, wide-ranging analysis of what went wrong with the USA’s response to Ebola, what went right and what needs to change,” said Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr, director of ICAP.

NBC NEWS
New Virus Found in Blood Supply — But Don’t Freak Out Just Yet – September 22, 2015

“We have been able to find a new virus. It’s clearly transmitted as a result of human (blood) transfusion,” said infectious disease expert Dr. Ian Lipkin, who oversaw the study team at Columbia University. … “So far there is no need to be concerned,” said Amit Kapoor, an assistant professor at Columbia University who led the study.

NEWSWEEK
Falling in (and Out of) Love Is Complicated When You’re Transgender – September 13, 2015

“It’s quite common for trans people to wonder, Will anyone love me?” says Walter Bockting, a psychiatrist and co-director of the LGBT Health Initiative at Columbia University.

WASHINGTON POST
Study Raises Questions About Transmission of Alzheimer’s Protein – September 9, 2015

“We designed the experiments to tell if the cell is up regulating its own production of tau, as a result of being in the same environment of the cells making human tao,” Karen Duff, a professor at Columbia University and lead author of the paper, told Time. “And we came to the conclusion that the tau was spreading. We suspect that the original cell dies and the tau is picked up by neighboring cells.”

TIME
Let Them Play August 11, 2015

According to a study published earlier this year and co-authored by Dr. Christopher Ahmad, professor of orthopedic surgery at the Columbia University Medical Center and head team physician for the New York Yankees, 46% of youth baseball players report being encouraged, at least once, to keep playing despite feeling arm pain.

Past issues of CUMC CELEBRATES: http://ps.columbia.edu/celebrates/