Columbia University Medical Center

Four CUMC Scientists Named AAAS Fellows

Four CUMC scientists—Robert Burke, Andrea Califano, Steven Siegelbaum, and Michael Shadlen—have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

This year 347 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874.

Robert Burke, MD, is the Alfred and Minnie Bressler Professor of Neurology (in Pathology and Cell Biology).

He was elected for distinguished contributions to neurology and neuroscience, using clinical and translational neuroscience approaches to study the cause and treatment of movement disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease.

Robert Burke
Andrea Califano, PhD, is chair of the Department of Systems Biology, the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology in the Department of Systems Biology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, and Biomedical Informatics, and director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center.

He was elected for distinguished contributions to the understanding of the regulatory logic of human cells in genome-wide fashion using a combination of computational and experimental methodologies.

Andrea Califano
Michael Shadlen, MD, PhD, is professor of neuroscience, HHMI investigator, and member of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science and the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University.

He was elected for his distinguished contributions to the field of neuroscience, particularly for pioneering the study of decision making at the neural, behavioral, and computational levels.

Michael Shadlen
Steven Siegelbaum, PhD, is chair of the Department of Neuroscience, HHMI investigator, professor of pharmacology, and member of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science and the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia.

He was elected for his work elucidating the biophysical mechanisms by which ion channels regulate neural activity to control hippocampal-dependent synaptic plasticity and memory storage.

Steven Siegelbaum