Columbia University Medical Center

2016 Research News in Review

CUMC’s most-read research articles of 2016 included news about wheat sensitivity, BPA, and an unusual type of human embryonic stem cell:


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Columbia Researchers Find Biological Explanation for Wheat Sensitivity

P&S researchers found that patients with non-celiac wheat sensitivity had a weakened intestinal barrier, leading to systemic inflammation and a variety of symptoms after ingesting wheat.

 


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Drug Restores Hair Growth in Patients with Alopecia Areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with an autoimmune disease that causes hair loss had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib.

 


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Heavy Cannabis Users Have Lower Dopamine Release in Brain

Heavy users of marijuana had lower levels of dopamine in a brain region involved in working memory, impulsive behavior, and attention, according to a study from CUMC’s Department of Psychiatry.


Prenatal BPA exposure linked to anxiety and depression in boys

Prenatal BPA Exposure Linked to Anxiety and Depression in Boys

Boys exposed prenatally to a common chemical used in plastics may be more likely to develop symptoms of anxiety and depression at age 10-12, a study by researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health found.


New HIV Infections Declining in Sub-Saharan African

New Infections Are Declining in Sub-Saharan Africa 

In Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Zambia, new infections are falling and the percentage of the population infected with HIV is stabilizing, a study by researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health found.

 


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Smell Test May Predict Early Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

Two studies suggested that an odor-identification test could be a low-cost way to identify patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.

 


Medicare Part D reduces out-of-pocket spending for seniors with diabetes

Out-of-Pocket Drug Expenses Drop for Medicare Recipients with Diabetes

Seniors who have diabetes are paying lower out-of-pocket costs for their medications since the launch of Medicare’s Part D prescription drug benefit, according to a study from School of Nursing researchers.


Nick Tatonetti (center) and his team (l-r) Tal Loberbaum, Phyllis Thangaraj, Kevin Sampson in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University, Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015. (E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune)

Dangerous Drug Interactions Uncovered with Data Science

Leveraging the power of big data, researchers from P&S and Columbia’s Data Science Institute uncovered a potentially dangerous drug interaction between ceftriaxone, an antibiotic, and lansoprazole, a heartburn medication.


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Scientists Generate a New Type of Human Stem Cell That Has Half a Genome

Scientists from P&S and elsewhere generated an embryonic stem cell that contains a single copy of the human genome. The cell may ease genetic analysis for cancer research, precision medicine, and regenerative medicine.


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Gum Disease Genes Identified by Columbia Researchers

Researchers have identified 41 master regulator genes that may cause gum disease, also known as periodontal disease.